Majid Salari Anthropology tag:http://www.majidsalari.ir 2018-02-18T09:40:16+01:00 mihanblog.com Medical Anthropology in Latin America 2010-08-24T22:08:11+01:00 2010-08-24T22:08:11+01:00 tag:http://www.majidsalari.ir/post/3 majid salari Professor Logan has long held a research focus on medical anthropology, with a concentration on ethnomedicine and medicinal botany. He has worked in the American Southwest, Mexico, Guatemala, Brazil, and India. Students under his direction have completed theses and dissertations on various topics pertaining to culture and health, ones ranging from helminthic parasitization in Mexico to spiritist healing in Brazil. Pictured to the left is the blossom of “Macpalxochitl” (Chiranthoden
 Medical Anthropology in Latin America
Professor Logan has long held a research focus on medical anthropology, with a concentration on ethnomedicine and medicinal botany. He has worked in the American Southwest, Mexico, Guatemala, Brazil, and India. Students under his direction have completed theses and dissertations on various topics pertaining to culture and health, ones ranging from helminthic parasitization in Mexico to spiritist healing in Brazil. Pictured to the left is the blossom of “Macpalxochitl” (Chiranthodendron pentadactylum), which was used by the 16th century Aztec as a tonic for the heart and blood. Peoples in Mexico today use it for the same purpose. Laboratory tests have demonstrated that this plant reduces serum cholesterol levels and improves cardiac-pulmonary capacity. Students with interests in the anthropology of health are encouraged to apply to our graduate program. Funding opportunities for students in cultural anthropology are excellent.

https://anthropology.utk.edu/sociocultural-anthropology/medical-anthropology-in-latin-america/
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Post-processual archaeology 2010-07-24T21:59:15+01:00 2010-07-24T21:59:15+01:00 tag:http://www.majidsalari.ir/post/2 majid salari Post-processual archaeology, which is sometimes alternately referred to as the interpretative archaeologies by its adherents,[1][2] is a movement in archaeological theory that emphasizes the subjectivity of archaeological interpretations. Despite having a vague series of similarities, post-processualism consists of "very diverse strands of thought coalesced into a loose cluster of traditions".[3] Within the post-processualist movement, a wide variety of theoretical viewpoints have been embraced,
Post-processual archaeology, which is sometimes alternately referred to as the interpretative archaeologies by its adherents,[1][2] is a movement in archaeological theory that emphasizes the subjectivity of archaeological interpretations. Despite having a vague series of similarities, post-processualism consists of "very diverse strands of thought coalesced into a loose cluster of traditions".[3] Within the post-processualist movement, a wide variety of theoretical viewpoints have been embraced, including structuralism and Neo-Marxism, as have a variety of different archaeological techniques, such as phenomenology.

The post-processual movement originated in the United Kingdom during the late 1970s and early 1980s, pioneered by archaeologists such as Ian Hodder, Daniel Miller, Christopher Tilley and Peter Ucko, who were influenced by French Marxist anthropology, postmodernism and similar trends in sociocultural anthropology. Parallel developments soon followed in the United States. Initially post-processualism was primarily a reaction to and critique of processual archaeology, a paradigm developed in the 1960s by 'New Archaeologists' such as Lewis Binford, and which had become dominant in Anglophone archaeology by the 1970s. Post-processualism was heavily critical of a key tenet of processualism, namely its assertion that archaeological interpretations could, if the scientific method was applied, come to completely objective conclusions. Post-processualists also criticized previous archaeological work for overemphasizing materialist interpretations of the past and being ethically and politically irresponsible.

In the United States, archaeologists widely see post-processualism as an accompaniment to the processual movement, while in the United Kingdom, they remain largely thought of as separate and opposing theoretical movements. In other parts of the world, post-processualism has made less of an impact on archaeological thought.[4]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Post-processual_archaeology
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What is Anthropology 2010-07-24T20:06:18+01:00 2010-07-24T20:06:18+01:00 tag:http://www.majidsalari.ir/post/1 majid salari Anthropology is the study of people throughout the world, their evolutionary history, how they behave, adapt to different environments, communicate and socialise with one another. The study of anthropology is concerned both with the biological features that make us human (such as physiology, genetic makeup, nutritional history and evolution) and with social aspects (such as language, culture, politics, family and religion). Whether studying a religious community in London, or human e
what is anthropology


Anthropology is the study of people throughout the world, their evolutionary history, how they behave, adapt to different environments, communicate and socialise with one another. The study of anthropology is concerned both with the biological features that make us human (such as physiology, genetic makeup, nutritional history and evolution) and with social aspects (such as language, culture, politics, family and religion). Whether studying a religious community in London, or human evolutionary fossils in the UAE, anthropologists are concerned with many aspects of people’s lives: the everyday practices as well as the more dramatic rituals, ceremonies and processes which define us as human beings. A few common questions posed by anthropology are: how are societies different and how are they the same? how has evolution shaped how we think? what is culture? are there human universals? By taking the time to study peoples’ lives in detail, anthropologists explore what makes us uniquely human. In doing so, anthropologists aim to increase our understanding of ourselves and of each other.


 
What do anthropologists do?

While a few anthropology postgraduates go on to work as lecturers or researchers within academia, a significant number are increasingly finding employment in a variety of sectors, ranging from education, charity and international development, to medicine and health-related professions, film and business. Often anthropologists do not follow linear career trajectories, but become involved in various projects in frequently overlapping career sectors. Take a look at our career paths section for case studies, websites and information on careers in anthropology. 

 
Studying anthropology

Both at undergraduate and at postgraduate level, studying anthropology imparts a unique set of skills for working with people. Gaining a deep understanding of cultural and ethnic differences and learning how people’s perspectives, beliefs and practices fit into a wider social, political and economic context is crucial in today’s globalised world. Take a look at our study & experience section for information on a wide range of programmes ranging from pre-university to distance learning and short evening courses.

 
Common misconceptions about anthropology

Anthropology as subject is not well known amongst the general population in Britain. As anthropology has not until now been taught at secondary school level (except as an option within the International Baccalaureate), the British general public’s exposure to anthropology tends to be limited to museums, occasional newspaper articles, or TV programmes whose primary aim is entertainment. The result is that many misconceptions about anthropology persist. A common one is that anthropology is mainly about ‘bones and fossils’. These are indeed the special concern of biological and evolutionary anthropologists, who use the evidence of human remains and living sites to reconstruct the bodies, diets and environments of our prehuman ancestors. Social and cultural anthropology, however, is concerned with social relations in the ‘here and now’. A second misconception is that social anthropologists exclusively study ‘tribal’ peoples in ‘remote’ areas, whose cultural practices are perceived as ‘exotic’. While it is true that some anthropologists carry out their research in places far from metropolitan centres, there are many others who undertake research in their home towns, in urban settings or in the industrial workplace. A third misconception is that anthropology and archaeology are one and the same. In North America archaeology is considered a branch of anthropology, whereas in Britain, archaeology is considered as a separate sister discipline to anthropology. Generally speaking, archaeology is about people and cultures in the near or distant past, and social anthropology is about present-day peoples and cultures.

https://www.discoveranthropology.org.uk/about-anthropology/what-is-anthropology.html
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